A Feminist’s View of ‘A Mercy’ by Toni Morrison

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Welcome back to my blog!

I just finished reading A Mercy by Toni Morrison and I noticed that many of the women throughout the novel experience oppression. I have been inspired to analyze the book from a feminist literary perspective.  Click on the video below to see a multimedia presentation about the sexism women experience in A Mercy.

 

Works Cited

Morrison, Toni. A Mercy. N.d. Good Reads. Web. 21 July 2017.

Napikoski, Linda. “What Is a Patriarchal Society and How Does It Relate to Feminism?” ThoughtCo. N.p., 31 Mar. 2016. Web. 21 July 2017.

Adnan Syed is Innocent until Proven Guilty

Welcome back to my blog! After listening to the Serial podcast by Sarah Koenig and learning about the recent appeal for Adnan Syed’s case, I was inspired to share my opinion on whether or not I believe Syed is guilty.

Listen to the podcast here

 

Works Cited

Koenig, Sarah. “Serial.” Interview. Audio blog post. N.p., n.d. Web. 28 July 2017.

McKirdy, Euan, et al. “Serial’ podcast’s Adnan Syed’s new trial appealed.” CNN. Cable News Network, 02 Aug. 2016. Web. 28 July 2017.

My Thoughts on ‘Serial’ Podcast by Sarah Koenig

Welcome back to my blog!

Recently, in this grade 12 English course, we learned about different types of media. I’m quite familiar with media, such as television, movies, radio and books. However, there is one medium that I am not very familiar with – and that medium is podcasts. Before this week, I had never listened to a podcast before. Yes, I had the pre-installed purple app on my iPhone, but that seemed as useless to me as the stocks app! However, podcasts are not useless. It is a very interesting medium that can deliver a message to it’s audience. I was skeptical of just how powerful a podcast could be, so I decided to listen to one.

serial-2

The logo for the podcast entitled ‘Serial’ by Sarah Koenig

 

The podcast that I listened to is the first episode of a series entitled Serial, hosted by Sarah Koenig. In the podcast, Koenig explains how she has spent the past year searching for answers to what happened between Hae Min Lee and Adnan Syed. Lee had been manually strangled to death on January 13, 1999. Just 6 weeks later, her ex-boyfriend, Syed was arrested for the crime and sentenced to a life in prison. However, there is no solid evidence to prove that he is guilty. The main reason why Syed was convicted of murder was because his friend testified against him. Syed claims that he did not murder Lee and that he would never do such a thing. Someone is clearly lying, and Koenig brings the audience along on her journey to find out who is not telling the truth.

However, it is important to note that Koenig began her research nearly 13 years after Lee’s death. This means that some of the interviews and statements are made 13 years after the incident. The story is bound to become twisted as time passes. To illustrate the challenges of memory, Koenig opens the podcast by asking people what they did on a specific day six weeks prior. Koenig includes recordings of the interviews so that the audience can hear the uncertainty in their voices as they struggle to remember the details of that day. It seemed that most people were just guessing what they did based on their usual routines. The only time that people seemed to remember, was when something significant happened on that day. However, their memory was still a bit blurry. It is understandable. If you were to ask me what I ate on my 16th birthday, I would be able to tell you because that was a memorable day filled with significant events. Yet, I can’t even remember what I ate for dinner yesterday. Since nearly all the information about this case is based on memory, I am concerned about the accuracy of the story being told. “Memoryisn’t like a file in our brain, but more like a story that is edited every time we tell it. To each re-telling, there are attached emotional details. So, when the story is altered, feelings are also reshaped” (Schiller). No matter how determined Koenig is to uncover the real story, it will never be completely accurate.

 

Although the details of the story may be inexact, I still enjoyed listening to Koenig narrate her search for answers. I think she is a great host for this podcast. Since Koenig is “like a bloodhound on this thing” (Koenig) and does a lot of personal investigative work, she speaks very passionately about the topic. Koenig is not afraid to share her personal thoughts and feelings towards the case as she openly explains her frustrations by swearing and sighing. I really appreciate how Koenig is not afraid to share her light-hearted personality with the audience whilst speaking about a very serious case. Without her entertaining narration, I think that the podcast could become too daunting and grim.

However, the story of Lee’s death is daunting and grim. It is easy to forget that this is a REAL story that deals with the lives of REAL people. I can’t imagine how Lee’s family feels about this podcast. It must be extremely difficult to relive the horrors of Lee’s death through the narration of someone that didn’t even know her. In February of 2016, Lee’s family released a statement regarding the podcast:

“It remains hard to see so many run to defend someone who committed a horrible crime, who destroyed our family, who refuses to accept responsibility, when so few are willing to speak up for Hae. […] We are grateful to the media for respecting our privacy, but we ask that everyone remember who the criminal is and who the victim is” (Lee).

The family have only spoken to the media once and refused to be part of the podcast. They were interviewed shortly after Syed was arrested and charged with Lee's murder. The victim's mother and brother are pictured 

The brother and mother of Hae Min Lee

Not only does the podcast raise awareness for the case, but it also provokes listeners to “pick a side.” Lee’s family is struggling to accept the fact that many of the podcast’s listeners support Syed and believe that he was wrongfully convicted. From the statement made by Lee’s family, it is clear this podcast has come as a hardship to them. Personally, I feel that this is one of the downfalls of presenting investigative journalism in such a public format.

Investigative journalism in the form of a podcast can have many negative outcomes. Online journalism tends to promote discussions within its comment section. Those grieving a loved one may find it difficult to read the opinions of those who are on the outside and looking in. Personally, I feel that this podcast has become more like entertainment, rather than a fight for justice. There are even sponsors for the podcast! If this podcast was created for strictly for justice, it should not be used to generate profit. In my opinion, investigative journalism in the form of a podcast can be easily publicised and can hurt the the families involved in the case.

Despite its negative effects on Lee’s family, I really enjoyed listening to the Serial podcast. I thought that Koenig was very engaging and passionate. I applaud all of her hard work; she spent a great deal of her time trying to find out what really happened to Lee. As this is the very first podcast I have ever listened to, I am very impressed with the level of communication through this auditory medium. If all podcasts are of such high quality, I will be spending a lot more of my time exploring this medium.

If you are interested in listening to ‘Serial’, click here for season one episode one.

 

Works Cited

Schiller, Arthur. “Your Memory Isn’t What You Think It Is.” Psychology Today. Sussex
Publishers, 16 July 2013. Web. 21 July 2017.

“Serial.” Serial. N.p., n.d. Web. 21 July 2017.

Wills, Robinson. “Family of ‘Serial’ victim Hae Min Lee say her convicted killer Adnan Syed ‘destroyed our family’ in emotional letter that slams the podcast’s fans for running to defend him.” Daily Mail Online. Associated Newspapers TM, 08 Feb. 2016. Web. 21 July 2017.

My Thoughts on ‘Serial’ Podcast

Welcome back to my blog!

Recently, in this grade 12 English course, we learned about different types of media. I’m quite familiar with media, such as television, movies, radio and books. However, there is one medium that I am not very familiar with – and that medium is podcasts. Before this week, I had never listened to a podcast before. Yes, I had the pre-installed purple app on my iPhone, but that seemed as useless to me as the stocks app! However, podcasts are not useless. It is a very interesting medium that can deliver a message to it’s audience. I was skeptical of just how powerful a podcast could be, so I decided to listen to one.

serial-2

The logo for the podcast entitled Serial by Sarah Koenig.

 

haemin.jpg

Adnan Syed (left) and Hae Min Lee (right)

The podcast that I listened to is the first episode of a series entitled Serial, hosted by Sarah Koenig. In the podcast, Koenig explains how she has spent the past year searching for answers to what happened between Hae Min Lee and Adnan Syed. Lee had been manually strangled to death on January 13, 1999. Just 6 weeks later, her ex-boyfriend, Syed was arrested for the crime and sentenced to a life in prison. However, there is no solid evidence to prove that he is guilty. The main reason why Syed was convicted of murder was because his friend testified against him. Syed claims that he did not murder Lee and that he would never do such a thing. Someone is clearly lying, and Koenig brings the audience along on her journey to find out who is not telling the truth.

However, it is important to note that Koenig began her research nearly 13 years after Lee’s death. This means that some of the interviews and statements are made 13 years after the incident. The story is bound to become twisted as time passes. To illustrate the challenges of memory, Koenig opens the podcast by asking people what they did on a specific day six weeks prior. Koenig includes recordings of the interviews so that the audience can hear the uncertainty in their voices as they struggle to remember the details of that day. It seemed that most people were just guessing what they did based on their usual routines. The only time that people seemed to remember, was when something significant happened on that day. However, their memory was still a bit blurry. It is understandable. If you were to ask me what I ate on my 16th birthday, I would be able to tell you because that was a memorable day filled with significant events. Yet, I can’t even remember what I ate for dinner yesterday. Since nearly all the information about this case is based on memory, I am concerned about the accuracy of the story being told. “Memory isn’t like a file in our brain, but more like a story that is edited every time we tell it. To each re-telling, there are attached emotional details. So, when the story is altered, feelings are also reshaped” (Schiller). No matter how determined Koenig is to uncover the real story, it will never be completely accurate.

 

TIME 100 GALA

Sarah Koenig: Host and producer of ‘Serial’

Although the details of the story may be inexact, I still enjoyed listening to Koenig narrate her search for answers. I think she is a great host for this podcast. Since Koenig is “like a bloodhound on this thing” (Koenig) and does a lot of personal investigative work, she speaks very passionately about the topic. Koenig is not afraid to share her personal thoughts and feelings towards the case as she openly explains her frustrations by swearing and sighing. I really appreciate how Koenig is not afraid to share her light-hearted personality with the audience whilst speaking about a very serious case. Without her entertaining narration, I think that the podcast could become too daunting and grim.

However, the story of Lee’s death is daunting and grim. It is easy to forget that this is a REAL story that deals with the lives of REAL people. I can’t imagine how Lee’s family feels about this podcast. It must be extremely difficult to relive the horrors of Lee’s death through the narration of someone that didn’t even know her. In February of 2016, Lee’s family released a statement regarding the podcast:

It remains hard to see so many run to defend someone who committed a horrible crime, who destroyed our family, who refuses to accept responsibility, when so few are willing to speak up for Hae. […] We are grateful to the media for respecting our privacy, but we ask that everyone remember who the criminal is and who the victim is” (Lee).

The family have only spoken to the media once and refused to be part of the podcast. They were interviewed shortly after Syed was arrested and charged with Lee's murder. The victim's mother and brother are pictured 

The brother and mother of Hae Min Lee

Not only does the podcast raise awareness for the case, but it also provokes listeners to “pick a side.” Lee’s family is struggling to accept the fact that many of the podcast’s listeners support Syed and believe that he was wrongfully convicted. From the statement made by Lee’s family, it is clear this podcast has come as a hardship to them. Personally, I feel that this is one of the downfalls of presenting investigative journalism in such a public format.

Investigative journalism in the form of a podcast can have many negative outcomes. Online journalism tends to promote discussions within its comment section. Those grieving a loved one may find it difficult to read the opinions of those who are on the outside and looking in. Personally, I feel that this podcast has become more like entertainment, rather than a fight for justice. There are even sponsors for the podcast! If this podcast was created for strictly for justice, it should not be used to generate profit. In my opinion, investigative journalism in the form of a podcast can be easily publicised and can hurt the the families involved in the case.

Despite its negative effects on Lee’s family, I really enjoyed listening to the Serial podcast. I thought that Koenig was very engaging and passionate. I applaud all of her hard work; she spent a great deal of her time trying to find out what really happened to Lee. As this is the very first podcast I have ever listened to, I am very impressed with the level of communication through this auditory medium. If all podcasts are of such high quality, I will be spending a lot more of my time exploring this medium.

If you are interested in listening to ‘Serial’, click here for season one episode one.

 

 

Works Cited

Schiller, Arthur. “Your Memory Isn’t What You Think It Is.” Psychology Today. Sussex
Publishers, 16 July 2013. Web. 21 July 2017.

“Serial.” Serial. N.p., n.d. Web. 21 July 2017.

Wills, Robinson. “Family of ‘Serial’ victim Hae Min Lee say her convicted killer Adnan Syed ‘destroyed our family’ in emotional letter that slams the podcast’s fans for running to defend him.” Daily Mail Online. Associated Newspapers TM, 08 Feb. 2016. Web. 21 July 2017.

 

A Mercy: Clear Archetypes in an Unclear Book

A Mercy by Toni Morrison is a painfully confusing book with (what seems to be) an interesting story line. I currently have a love-hate relationship with this book. I love the theme, but often have a difficult time understanding what is going on. I have never read a book that has been presented in such a confusing manner. Morrison has written each chapter of the book from a different character’s perspective. I am constantly finding myself focused on trying to figure out which character is speaking, rather than the story line itself. However, Morrison introduces common archetypes into the book which helps me understand the story a lot better.

a mercy

A Mercy by Toni Morrison

From what I understand, the story takes place on Jacob and Rebekka Vaark’s tobacco plantation, where three female slaves work. When Rebekka becomes sick, a slave by the name of Florens slave is sent out on a long journey to find medical help from their former blacksmith. The book heavily revolves around slavery, unlikely lovers, and motherhood. I do not want to spoil the book for anyone, so that is all the information I will tell!

As I said earlier, this book is not very easy to follow. Fortunately, many characters introduced in this book could be considered “archetypal characters.” This helped me understand certain characters to a higher degree, as their behavior and personality is something I have seen in other stories. For example, I had a difficult time understanding Lina, one of the female slaves. After reading more about the way she mentors Florens, one of the younger slaves, it became clear that Lina is the “loving mother” archetype. A mother archetype is someone who “has the capacity for the immense expression of unconditional love, devotion and caring” (Couch). I think that definition describes Lina perfectly. Although Lina is not Florens’ biological mother, she still expresses love, guidance and concern for her. For example, Florens has a difficult time dealing with her broken heart, so Lina snuggles up beside her and tries to comfort her (Morrison 150). Lina remembers Florens’ favourite story and tells her the uplifting tale (Morrison 150). Lina knows the perfect way to put Florens’ mind at ease and makes it clear that she a mother’s magic touch.

mother-daughter-reading-1-760x506

A caring mother reading a story to her daughter to make her happy.

The relationship between Lina and Florens reminds me of the relationship between Katniss and Rue. Katniss and Rue are characters in the movie entitled The Hunger Games. In the movie, Katniss acts as Rue’s mentor and motherly figure. Katniss provides protection and support for her, just like Lina does for Florens. Neither Katniss or Lina are biological mothers; however, this does not mean they are incapable of showing compassion and empathy towards others. The scene where Katniss and Rue share a meal reminds me of the mother-daughter relationship between Lina and Florens. Similar to Lina, Katniss is very poor. Katniss struggles to find food, but once she does, she makes sure to share it with Rue. While eating together, Katniss and Rue tell each other stories about their past to help put their minds at ease from all the chaos that surrounds them. The way Katniss provides Rue with comfort and love is very similar to the way Lina provides for Florens. Katniss and Lina reveal that a loving mother archetype can still apply to characters who show no biological relation to their son or daughter figure.

Katniss-and-Rue-the-hunger-games-38803461-500-450

Katniss and Rue (Characters in The Hunger Games) laughing together as they eat.

In the book, one of the female slaves by the name of Sorrow gives birth to a baby. However, the baby dies shortly after being born. Sorrow becomes emotionally and physically distant from the other slaves. Lina is concerned for her, which further shows her motherly love for others. Lina decides “to look for Sorrow down by the river” as that is “where she often went to talk to her dead baby” (Morrison 59). Rivers are common archetypes which are used to symbolize death (Rudd). Through the introduction of a river archetype, Morrison was able to express to the audience that Sorrow is feeling distraught at the death of her baby.

river.jpg

A river which symbolizes death according to common archetypes.

 

Sorrow is not the only slave undergoing hardship. Florens is also experiencing a troublesome journey. However, Florens’ journey seems to be more like a typical archetypal hero’s journey. A archetypal hero’s journey is described as someone who leaves the world they are familiar with and enters a new one in order to find something/someone needed to save the day (Winkle). Typically, the someone/something they need is far away, and so there are often roadblocks along the way. For Florens, her journey consists of a long and lonely walk through the forest in order to find the blacksmith who has the medicine needed to heal Rebekka (Morrison 41). Some of the roadblocks that stand in her way are the animals lurking in the forest (Morrison 41). Florens decides that she must protect herself from the animals by sleeping in the uncomfortable branches of a pine tree (Morrison 41). Florens is very determined to reach success as she makes sacrifices like this in order to get the medicine needed save someone’s life. I hope that Florens ends up finding the blacksmith and getting the medicine, as her journey will feel well worth the trouble once she feels like a hero.

Much like Florens, who has yet to finish her journey, I have yet to finish mine. My journey consists of me trying to read this book. My roadblocks are the book’s constant perspective changes. However, I hope to not be phased by them throughout the second half of the book. I also think that the second half of the book will include many more archetypes which shall presume to help with my understanding. Lastly, I have learned some things on my journey that I would like to share. If you are thinking about reading A Mercy by Toni Morrison, I strongly advise you to review some common archetypal symbols beforehand. The book can become very confusing at times; however, Morrison uses many archetypes throughout the book which can aid in your understanding of the interesting story line.

 

Works Cited

Couch, Stacey L.L. “The Mother Archetype” Wild Gratitude. Wild Gratitude LLC, 2 May 2016. Web. 12 July 2017.

Golden, Carl. “The 12 Common Archetypes.” Soul Craft. Soul Craft, n.d. Web. 12 July 2017

Hunger games. Dir. Gary Ross. Lions gate, 2012. Film.

Morrison, Toni. A mercy. London: Vintage, 2016. Print.

Rudd, Deborah. Archetypes in Literature. N.p., 27 Jan. 1997. Web. 12 July 2017.

Winkle, Chris. “The Eight Character Archetypes of the Hero’s Journey.” Mythcreants. Mythcreants LLC, n.d. Web. 12 July 2017.

 

Grade 12 University Level English as a Requirement for Entry into all University Programs

There are numerous courses in which a high school student can choose to fill their timetable with. However, some of the courses found on a timetable are compulsory; students must take them whether they like it or not. Grade 12 English is one of those compulsory courses. High school students must obtain this credit in order to enter any university program. I agree with this requirement. I believe proficiency in the English language is necessary to achieve maximum success in all areas of life, especially university.

high-school-courses

Possible courses that a high school student may choose to fill their timetable with. Image retrieved from http://www.collegeprepresults.com/exceptions-high-school-course-selection-advice/

In any university program, students are expected to efficiently take notes, analyze texts and write essays. The professor is most likely not going to teach students how to do that; these are skills that should already be attained before entering university. The Grade 12 University level English course is the necessary prerequisite which teaches students how to do these things. This way, students will be prepared to excel in any university program. For example, as I obtain my grade 12 English credit, I hope to improve my reading comprehension skills. Even though I do not plan on studying English in University, the skills I will have acquired from this English course will still be very beneficial. I plan on studying Science at Western university; I will be given many scientific articles and reports to read in this program. However, I will feel confident in understanding various texts as this vital high school course has taught me how to process information. English concepts are constantly being used in each and every program, not just English and Literature programs. Therefore, in order to achieve maximum success in any university program, students must be able to demonstrate skills that were taught in a grade 12 English course.

engss

Required prerequisites for Science program at Western University. Image retrieved from http://www.electronicinfo.ca/programs/349

Quite often, work experience is a vital component of a university program’s curriculum. For example, my older brother is studying Kinesiology at Western and is completing an enriching co-op placement at a physiology center. In order to obtain such placement, he had to be able to write a letter and a resumé. Concepts, such as grammar and form, taught from the Grade 12 English Ontario curriculum were put to great use in his situation. After writing a successful letter and resumé, my brother was then asked to complete an in-person interview. One may wonder how English can be beneficial in social settings such as an interview. This is where many of the oral skills taught in a grade 12 University level English class come into play. My brother was able to speak with confidence as he was familiar with techniques such as enunciation, pace and fluency. He can thank his grade 12 English teacher for successfully teaching him the English concepts needed to excel out in the real world.

Without this crucial course, students would struggle to succeed in university. To avoid this unnecessary struggle, students can put in some extra work and obtain their grade 12 University English credit. This would allow students to familiarize themselves with English concepts needed to excel in any University program; this is why I support the attainment of grade 12 University level English upon university entry.


“Co-op Programs and Internships.” International & Exchange Student Centre. Western University, n.d. Web. 05 July 2017.

“Grades 11 and 12 English.” Ontario Curriculum. Ontario Ministry of Education, n.d. Web. 05 July 2017.

Ontario, Government. “What Do You Need to Graduate?” Ministry of Education. Government of Ontario, n.d. Web. 05 July 2017.

“OSSD High School Credits.” Ontario Secondary School Diploma. Ontario’s Designated Provider of Distance Education, n.d. Web. 05 July 2017.

“Science.” Welcome to Western. Western University, n.d. Web. 05 July 2017.